SINE CABOLOAN

The independent cinema of the Pangasinan province, Philippines

Archive for News

Outline Proposal for Sapa’n Palapar (The Wide River)

Main Idea:

The filmmaker wants to make a personal film that aims to create an evocative autoethnography of the present-day Pangasinan and Ibaloi communities who have been living for centuries in the Agno River basin. Presently, the Agno River basin is one of the largest centers of agriculture and aquaculture in the northern Philippines, it is also a center for large-scale commercial gold mining operations in the Philippines, it is also the location of one of the biggest as well as highly controversial hydroelectric dams built in Southeast Asia over the recent years, and it is also one of most ecologically unstable and vulnerable places in northern Philippines prone to siltation, toxic mine spill, water quality issues, and massive floodings during the rainy monsoon season. The Agno River basin is also the home of two related ethno-linguistic communities in the northern Philippines, the Ibaloi people in the upstream of the Agno River and the Pangasinan people in the downstream of the Agno River. For thousands of years, each of these two communities have evolved a distinct culture that is attuned with the mighty river’s natural cycles. The Agno River is also one of the largest river systems in the northern Philippines.

The filmmaker aims to create a feature-length experimental film and hybrid documentary by combining old newsreel footages of the Agno River and the Great Flood of Luzon in 1972, cinema verite style scenes where actual subjects would reveal their thoughts and emotions for the film, boat shots of the Agno River at present, scenes of everyday life of the subjects, fictional scenes including surreal sequences, and citations of statistics and historical data revealed through a voice narration.

Background:

The Agno River Basin is one of the two major river basins in Central Luzon covering an area of 13,800 km2. The Agno River with its tributaries, drains several provinces, but the major part of its catchment is situated in the Pangasinan province which is mainly a lowland rice-producing area.
The Agno River is about 270 kilometers in length from its source in the Cordillera mountains to its mouth in the Lingayen Gulf. It drains the southeastern half of the Central Cordillera in Benguet province, flows across the broad Pangasinan plain, and enters the Lingayen Gulf emptying into the South China Sea. Stream gradients are steep in the upper reaches and flatten appreciably downstream from San Manuel, from where the river flows south to Tayug, veers off to the southwest through Rosales, and into the Poponto Swamps, (also known as Mangabol Marsh), where it is joined by the Tarlac River. From the Poponto Swamps, the flow becomes northwestward, skirting the eastern slope of the Zambales Mountains and finally discharging into the Lingayen Gulf.

The Cordillera Central, from which the Agno River rises, is geologically a young mountain range with very pronounced erosion phenomena and a morphology characterized by steep slopes and narrow gorges. The lowland plain is filled in by sediments carried by rivers and deposited in fans and bars. This sedimentation process tends to isolate low areas between relatively higher levels so that a large portion of the Pangasinan plain suffers from inadequate drainage and flooding, particularly in the lower part of the Agno River plain.

The river is torrential, high sediment transport capacity in the mountains, and meandering and sharply reduced flow velocity and sediment transport in the plains. The climate of the Agno River Basin is characterized by two seasons: a dry period from November to April, and a wet period during the rest of the year. According to Elvira Baluyot, a private researcher for the Inland Resources Development Corporation:

“The Agno River basin in Luzon in the Philippines has been under considerable stress from development activities. The upper catchment has been exposed to drastic and rapid deforestation and to extensive mining, both leading to heavy erosion, high sediment load in the Agno River, and siltation. In the lower basin, three dams have been constructed for hydropower and irrigation purposes, both of them functioning also as sediment traps.”
Main Subject and Theme:

The filmmaker was born and grew up in the town of Bayambang in the province of Pangasinan in the northern Philippines. Bayambang is one of the big towns in the Pangasinan province that is a part of the floodplains of the lower Agno River basin. His ancestral home is located only one kilometer from the Agno River. He grew up attuned to the natural cycles of the Agno River and has heard countless stories from his elders that show the relationship of the mighty river with the people of his town.

During his adolescent years in the early nineties, he had spent a considerable amount of his free time exploring the river banks by himself closely observing the native flora growing on the site as well as the topography of the river. In 2008, the filmmaker returned to his hometown of Bayambang to make a feature-length experimental film about Pangasinan’s art and culture. The Agno River became one of the film’s location and it also became one of the most important elements in the film’s non-linear narrative which articulated the death and the rebirth of Pangasinan’s art and culture. The film was screened at important film festivals in the Philippines and abroad and has received several awards and citations. The film also became one of the acclaimed independent films of 2009 and 2010 in the Philippines. The film also became the first feature-length film in the native Pangasinan language. Recently for the past few years, the filmmaker has visited the upstream areas of the Agno River at several towns in the province of Benguet as a hiker who is lured into the scenic mountain landscapes of the region.

This documentary film project will become the filmmaker’s small tribute to the Agno River. By gathering the stories of hardships, community history, legends, and collective aspirations of individuals whose lives and destinies were shaped and are continually linked to the Agno River, the filmmaker aims to create a complex portrait of the life and death as well as the history and the future of the Agno River and the two ethnic communities that live along its banks.

Location:

The three locations of the film are the town of San Carlos City, the town of Itogon, and the town of Bayambang, three important communities lying along the downstream and upstream path of the Agno River in the Pangasinan and Benguet provinces. Three subjects are chosen in each of the locations whose personal narratives would become a part of the film.

Time Frame of the Project:

The film would be shot over a course of one year. Post-production would start on the second year.

Sapan'Palapar Still Picture 1

Advertisements

Synopsis for Sapa’n Palapar (The Wide River)

A new feature-length experimental documentary film
Original Story, Screenplay, & Director: Christopher Gozum
Language: Pangasinan and Ibaloi with English subtitles
Production Company: Sine Caboloan Co.Ltd.
Tentative Producers: National Commission for Culture and the Arts (Philippines), Cinema One Originals (Philippines); Asian Cinema Fund (South Korea)
Projected Running Time: 75 minutes
Shooting Format: Full-HD 24p

An emerging Filipino-American writer returns to the heart of the Agno River basin in Central Pangasinan, her birth place, in search of her long lost mother who was mysteriously swept away by the raging floodwaters of the Agno River during the Great Flood of Luzon in 1972. This acclaimed writer has the extraordinary ability of listening to the minds and hearts of people just by looking at them even from a distance. She levitates at various places in San Carlos City, Itogon, and Bayambang, three important communities lying along the downstream and upstream path of the Agno River in the Pangasinan and Benguet provinces, encountering individuals, listening eagerly to their stories of hardships, community history, legends, and collective aspirations, hoping that from these broken narratives she may pick up a clue as to what has happened to her mother during the Great Flood of Luzon in 1972.

The first location where the exiled writer mounts her search is downstream of the Agno River in San Carlos City (formerly Binalatongan), one of the oldest, largest, and most progressive towns of the Pangasinan province. She encounters real life characters: a surgeon who advocates for heritage conservation in San Carlos, an old farmer in Barangay Salinap, a teenage boy in Barangay San Juan who constantly sees ghosts of people who had lived during the Spanish colonial period near his home in the old town site of Binalatongan, and the mysterious maiden naming Mangatarem who guards the fabled sunken golden bell of old Binalatongan in the depths of the San Juan River, a tributary of the Agno River in San Carlos City.

The second location where the returning writer mounts her search is upstream of the Agno River in its headwaters in the town of Itogon covering the gold mining communities and the controversial San Roque Megadam. She encounters real life characters: an Ibaloi historian teaching at a university in Baguio City who articulates the shared history and culture of the Ibaloi and the Pangasinan communities through the Agno River, an Ibaloi community leader who opposed the construction of the San Roque Dam when his ancestral land was submerged by the construction of the controversial project, an Ibaloi vegetable farmer who also earns a living as a traditional small-scale miner and guide assisting tourists who hike the scenic mountain trail of Barangay Dalupirip, and a middle-aged mother believed to be possessed by the spirit of Deboxah, the legendary warrior-princess of the ancient Pangasinan kingdom in which Itogon used to be a part.

The third location where the artist-pilgrim mounts her search is downstream of the Agno River in the central Pangasinan town of Bayambang, where she was born and where she spent her childhood. She encounters real life characters: a disillusioned Catholic priest who leads the parish of Bayambang as the town celebrates its Quadricentennial foundation, a housewife who had lost her parents and younger brother during the Great Flood of Luzon in 1972, another housewife who earns her living selling dressed chicken in the public market of Bayambang, and the guardian spirit of the river (danaya na Agno) who takes lives of unsuspecting children and visitors annually.

Combining old newsreel footages of the Agno River and the Great Flood of Luzon in 1972, cinema verite style scenes where actual subjects would reveal their thoughts and emotions for the film, boat shots of the Agno River at present, scenes of everyday life of the subjects, fictional scenes including surreal sequences, and citations of statistics and historical data revealed through a voice narration, the experimental film and hybrid documentary aims to create an evocative autoethnography of the present-day Pangasinan and Ibaloi communities who have been living for centuries in the Agno River basin.
1614452_10152014243789779_287509830_o

Philippines’ best artists honored at 5th Ani ng Dangal

Philippines’ best artists honored at 5th Ani ng Dangal by By Dexter Rodrigo Matilla (philstar.com) March 9, 2013

MANILA, Philippines – The National Commission on Culture and the Arts honored Filipinos in various artistic disciplines last night at the Cultural Center of the Philippines during the 5th Ani ng Dangal Awards, the culminating event of this year’s National Arts Month.

Then President Corazon Aquino, via Presidential Decree 683, made the declaration in 1991 that February of every year is National Arts Month in the Philippines.

The Ani ng Dangal awardees are decided based on the Seven (7) Art Disciplines by the 7 Artistic Committees headed by NCCA Chairman Felipe de Leon, Jr. Included also is the Multi-Disciplinary Arts category.

As yesterday was also International Women’s Day, De Leon, Jr. commented that last night’s ceremony was quite befitting.

“Marami tayong kababaihan dito na nasa pinakamataas na bahagi ng sining from the one and only Superstar Ms. Nora Aunor to this generation’s pop star princess Ms. Sarah Geronimo.”

Aunor was honored for her contribution to cinema while Geronimo, named NCCA’s Goodwill Ambassadress for Music recently, was honored under the Multi-Disciplinary Arts category.”Maraming-maraming salamat po… isa lamang ako sa mga nauna at naging blessed na mapansin at mabigyan ng big break,” Geronimo says.

The winners for each category are:

Architecture and Allied Arts
Arch. Abelardo Tolentino, Jr. Aidea Philippines, Inc.
Kenneth Cobonpue, “Cabaret Sofa”

Cinema
Adrian Sibal, “The Rivals”
Auraeus Solito, “Busong”
Brillante Mendoza, “Thy Womb”
Charles Andrew Flamiano , “Letting Go, Letting God”
Christopher Gozum, “Anacbuana”
Eduardo Roy, Jr., “Bahay Bata”
John Paul Su, “Pagpag”
Lav Diaz, “Florentinahubaldo, CTE”
Lawrence Fajardo, “Posas”
Marlon Rivera, “Ang Babae sa Septic Tank”
Brandon Relucio & Ivan Zaldarriaga, “Di Ingon ‘Nato”
Marty Syjuco, “Give Up Tomorrow”
Nora Aunor, “Thy Womb”
Shamaine Buencamino, “Niño”
Will Fredo, “The Caregiver”

Visual Arts
Engr. Jaime Sumugat Singlador
George Tapan
Jamia Mei Tolentino
Jamille Bianca Aguilar
Zohayma Montañer
Joel C. Forte
Jophel Ybiosa
Trisha Co Reyes

Dance
Candice Adea
Halili Cruz Dance Company
Irina Feleo (Bayanihan Philippine National Folk Dance Company)
Peter Laurent Callangan (Bayanihan Philippine National Folk Dance Company)
The Crew

Dramatic Arts
Peter De Guzman, “The Romance of Magno Rubio”

Literary Arts
Romulo Baquiran, Jr.

Music
Arwin Tan
Baao Children Chorus
Edgardo “Ed” Lumbera Manguiat
Imusicapella
Joseleo Ciballos Logdat
Miriam College High School Glee Club
Muntinlupa Science High School Chorale
Novo Concertante Manila Choir
Samiweng Singers, Ilocos Norte National High School (INNHS)
University of the Philippines Singing Ambassadors
UP Concert Chorus

Multi-Disciplinary Arts
BBDO Guerrero
Kara David, i-Witness GMA 7
Sarah Geronimo
Wansapanataym, ABS-CBN Corporation

“Promoting and developing the arts and cultural identity of a people inevitably advances their skills and potential for achievement and leads to all other developments,” De Leon, Jr. says.

For Future Reference: The Top Filipino Films of 2011

by Richard Bolisay from Lilok Pelikula: Sculpting Cinema December 25, 2012

Old habits die hard, and one of them turns out to be one year late.

1. LAWAS KAN PINABLI, Christopher Gozum

2. BIG BOY, Shireen Seno

3. TUNDONG MAGILIW, Jewel Maranan

4. ISDA, Adolfo Alix, Jr.

5. ELEHIYA SA DUMALAW MULA SA HIMAGSIKAN, Lav Diaz

6. X-DEAL, Lawrence Fajardo

7. BAHAY BATA, Eduardo Roy, Jr.

8. PAHINGA, Khavn De La Cruz

9. WON’T LAST A DAY WITHOUT YOU, Raz Dela Torre

10. EX PRESS, Jet Leyco

NCCA 2013 Ani ng Dangal Awardees Official List

Reblogged from mixofeverything.blogspot.com by Myke Soon

Tuesday, January 29, 2013
NCCA 2013 Ani ng Dangal Awardees official list.

February of every year is National Arts Month in the Philippines. Then President Corazon C. Aquino made this declaration in 1991 via Presidential Decree 683. For two decades the NCCA has been supporting various local projects and special events during National Arts Month to showcase the best of the Philippine artistic and cultural scene.

In 2009, the NCCA elevated what has been a national undertaking into a consolidated international event that is the Philippine Arts Festival (PAF). PAF is the NCCA’s contribution to the celebration of National Arts Month. Its tagline is “Ani ng Sining”, and the festival has proven through the years that is indeed a harvest for the arts.

NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR CULTURE AND THE ARTS just released the official list of Awardees of the 2013 Ani ng Dangal Awards.

Architecture and Allied Arts
 Architect Abelardo Tolentino Jr., Aidea Philippines, Inc.
 Kenneth Cobonpue, “Cabaret Sofa”

Cinema
 Adrian Sibal “The Rivals”
 Auraeus Solito “Busong”
 Brillante Mendoza “Thy Womb”
 Charles Andrew Flamiano “Letting Go, Letting God”
 Christopher Gozum “Anacbuana”
 Eduardo Roy Jr. “Bahay Bata”
 John Paul Su “Pagpag”
 Lav Diaz “Florentinahubaldo CTE”
 Lawrence Fajardo “Posas”
 Marlon Rivera “Ang Babae sa Septic Tank”
 Marty Syjuco “Give Up Tomorrow”
 Nora Aunor “Thy Womb”
 Shamaine Buencamino “Niño”
 Will Fredo “The Caregiver”

Visual Arts
 Engr. Jaime Sumugat Singlador
 George Tapan
 Jamia Mei Tolentino
 Jamille Bianca Aguilar
 Joel C. Forte
 Jophel Ybiosa
 Trisha Co Reyes

Dance
 Candice Adea
 Halili Cruz Ballet Company
 The Crew

Dramatic Arts
 Peter De Guzman “Ang Romansa ni Magno Rubio”

Literary
 Romulo Baquiran, Jr.

Music
 Arwin Tan
 Baao Children Chorus
 Edgardo “Ed” Lumbera Manguiat
 Imusicapella
 Joseleo Ciballos Logdat
 Miriam College High School Glee Club
 Muntinlupa Science High School Chorale
 Novo Concertante Manila Choir
 Samiweng Singers, Ilocos Norte National High School (INNHS)
 University of the Philippines Singing Ambassadors
 UP Concert Chorus

Multi-Disciplinary Arts 4
 BBDO Guerrero,
 Kara David, i-Witness, GMA 7
 Sarah Geronimo
 Wansapanataym. ABS-CBN Corporation

Ani ng Dangal or “Harvest of Honors” is an annual affair in the Philippines celebrated as a highlight and concluding rite of the Philippine Arts Festival, which is graced by the President of the Philippines at the Malacañan Palace.

The Ani ng Dangal is given to a natural-born Filipino artist or group that has reaped top honors in international events. Its coverage includes the seven art disciplines:

· Architecture and Allied Arts
· Cinema
· Dance
· Dramatic Arts
· Literary Arts
· Music
· Visual Arts

Ani ng Dangal Trophy

The Ani ng Dangal Trophy is a stylized sarimanok sculpted by National Artist for Visual Arts, Abdulmari Asia Imao. In Imao’s hands the Maranao mythical bird is masterfully transformed into a mono-winged creature with the PAF rice stalk logo incorporated in the rampant wing’s feathers. The creature soars above a globe symbolizing the height of artistic achievement in the global stage.

NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR CULTURE AND THE ARTS
633 General Luna St., Intramuros 1002 Manila / Tel. 527-2192 to 98/ Fax. 527-2191 & 98 / e-mail : info@ncca.gov.ph / website : http://www.ncca.gov.ph

Film on Pangasinan Poetry Scores in Paris Fest

Riyadh-based Filipino filmmaker Christopher Gozum now yearns to return to his home country to make films … and plant trees

By Bayani San Diego Jr.of the Philippine Daily Inquirer January 23,2013

Filipino filmmaker Christopher Gozum wasn’t able to attend the 10th International Festival Signes de Nuit in Paris, France—where his film “Anacbanua (Child of the Sun)” won in October last year. He had pressing commitments in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where he works as a medical videographer and video editor, he told the Inquirer in an e-mail interview.

Gozum said “Anacbanua,” which won the Prix de Signes in the Paris fest’s Cinema in Transgression section, went beyond Pangasinan’s poetry tradition. “The anlong, or Pangasinense poems that are featured in the film, articulate my province’s distinct culture and identity,” he said.

The film has traveled beyond local shores. Before the Paris win, “Anacbanua” was screened in festivals in Mumbai, Bangkok, Jeonju and Prague.

“Terms like ‘regional cinema’ or ‘regional art’ no longer make sense to me,” Gozum elaborated. “Artists from the provinces don’t need [the Cultural Center of the Philippines’ stamp of] approval to be appreciated and recognized by foreign audiences.”

He found out about the Signes de Nuit fest through the website of the British Council. After making a cold call, he sent DVDs of his films, “Anacbanua” and “Gurgurlis Ed Banua (Landscape With Figures),” to the Paris fest organizers.

He soon received an e-mail from fest programmer Dieter Wieczorek inviting him not only to screen his two films but to act as jury member as well. (Unfortunately, he couldn’t get away from his work in Riyadh.)

In any case, “Anacbanua” won an award and was aired on Tele Bocal, a French channel that showcases experimental films, on Oct. 26.

Previously, “Anacbanua” won the Digital Lokal Lino Brocka grand prize and best director award at the Cinemanila fest in 2009.

Three hours

Last year, he screened his latest film, a three-hour experimental documentary, “Lawas Kan Pinabli (Forever Loved),” at the Cinemanila, Cinema Rehiyon, the Edinburgh International Film Festival and the Yerba Buena Arts Center in San Francisco.

“Lawas Kan Pinabli” tells the story of overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) in the Middle East.

In the pipeline are two more indie films on Pangasinan: “Say Kalayan Na Linang Tan Balitok (The River of Silt and Gold)” and “Luyag D’ara’y Anino (Kingdom of Shadows).”

“Both these projects are on the research and writing stages,” he said. “‘Say Kalayan’ is an experimental docu about Pangasinan and Ibaloi communities living along Agno River. ‘Luyag’ is a feature film about a middle-aged OFW employed as a shepherdess in a remote mountain village in the Middle East. It’s based on a true story.”

Future plans

He said that in a few years, he hopes “to return and settle permanently in my hometown of Bayambang, Pangasinan, to focus on independent filmmaking and organic farming.”

With this goal in mind, he will visit the country in May to “do field research on a new film and plant native trees and vegetables in my small farm in Bayambang.”

He considers the Paris honor as one step that brings him closer to his dream. “It proves to me that my experimentation and risk-taking in cinema has paid off.”

(bayanisandiegojr@gmail.com)

2009: Highlights in Film

By Oggs Cruz published at Lessons From The School of Inattention on January 1, 2010

2009 has been both kind and cruel to Philippine cinema. As we celebrate the numerous recognitions Filipino films are getting from beyond Philippine shores (Brillante Mendoza winning Best Director in Cannes for Kinatay (The Execution of P) with Raya Martin’s Independencia (which is the second Filipino film, after Mendoza’s Serbis (Service) in 2008, to be featured in the prestigious New York Film Festival) and Manila (co-directed with Adolfo Alix, Jr.) also premiering in the film festival; Pepe Diokno’s Engkwentro (Clash) winning the Luigi de Laurentiis Award and the Orrizonti Prize in Venice, where Mendoza’s Lola (Grandmother) premiered in the main competition of the film festival; Pusan and Thessaloniki putting the spotlight on Philippine cinema, concentrating on the diverse output of the new wave of directors from the vibrant independent scene; Vienna holding a retrospective of Lino Brocka’s works; among many others), we mourn the untimely passing of the heroes of Philippine cinema: Alexis Tioseco, a great critic who championed Southeast Asian, and more specifically Philippine cinema, concentrating on the films of the Diaz, Martin, and John Torres, whose works he dearly loved, with endless passion; and Johnny Delgado, a great actor whose collaborations with almost all of the country’s great filmmakers (Brocka, Mike De Leon, Gerry De Leon, Laurice Guillen, and Celso A. Castillo), make up a portion of this country’s vibrant cinema.

2009 also saw the continuation of what ails our cinema: an unimaginative mainstream (although I must admit that Chito Rono’s T2, the first half of which is quite intriguing, Olive Lamasan’s In My Life, a baby step for the mainstream to embrace gay cinema (as opposed to the banal comedies of Joel Lamangan that merely re-echoed the stereotypes of homosexuality from past decades with contemporary idiocy), and Laurice Guillen’s I Love You, Goodbye, a fine film except that it ended illogically, were minor delights), and local film distributors that favor brainless blockbusters (Michael Bay’s Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen and Chris Weitz’s New Moon) to quality imports (although the latter part of the year saw the surprising commercial release of Werner Herzog’s The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call – New Orleans, James Gray’s Two Lovers, Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds and Wes Anderson’s Fantastic Mr. Fox). Despite that, the year saw the continuation of what gives us hope in our cinema: Cinemalaya, despite my apprehensions to its raison d’etre of independence through creative compromise, had a roster of good to great products (Alvin Yapan’s Ang Panggagahasa Kay Fe (The Rapture of Fe), Veronica Velasco’s Last Supper No. 3, Borgy Torre’s charming short Bonsai); Cinemanila, apart from showcasing the best films from around the world (including Christopher Chong’s Karaoke, Sergei Dvortsevoy’s Tulpan and Tomas Alfredson’s Let the Right One In), saw the premieres of Raymond Red’s Himpapawid (Manila Skies), his first film since winning the Palm D’Or for his short film Anino (Shadows), Christopher Gozum’s Anacbanua (Child of the Sun), and Armando Lao’s Biyaheng Lupa (Soliloquy), and CinemaOne, despite my problem with the festival’s treatment of its director’s property rights with regards their films, which produced its sole masterpiece, Ray Gibraltar’s Wanted: Border.

One can only hope for better things for 2010: with filmmakers getting their due respect, not only in terms of recognition but also basic sustenance (it pains me to see these filmmakers struggling to pay off debts incurred for the sole reason of advancing this country’s cinematic culture); with our audience actually watching the films that have garnered worldwide fanfare instead of simply reading about them from obscure press releases in several broadsheets; with more film lovers writing about our cinema, giving room to responsible discourse about our films. Now, on to the lists:

******

Top 10 Foreign Films Released in 2009

1) The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call – New Orleans (Werner Herzog)
2) Two Lovers (James Gray)
3) Ponyo (Hayao Miyazaki)
4) Karaoke (Christopher Chong)
5) Let the Right One In (Tomas Alfredson)
6) Fantastic Mr. Fox (Wes Anderson)
7) Public Enemies (Michael Mann)
8) Tulpan (Sergei Dvortsevoy)
9) Inglorious Basterds (Quentin Tarantino)
10) Drag Me To Hell (Sam Raimi)

*****

Top 10 Filipino Films Released in 2009

1) Independencia (Raya Martin)
2) Kinatay (The Execution of P, Brillante Mendoza)
3) Wanted: Border (Ray Gibraltar)
4) Anacbanua (Child of the Sun, Christopher Gozum)
5) Lupang Hinarang (Hindered Land, Ditsi Carolino)
6) Himpapawid (Manila Skies, Raymond Red)
7) Walang Alaala ang mga Paru-paro (Butterflies Have No Memories, Lav Diaz)
8) Ang Panggagahasa Kay Fe (The Rapture of Fe, Alvin Yapan)
9) Last Supper No. 3 (Veronica Velasco)
10) Kimmy Dora (Joyce Bernal)

*****

Top 5 Older Filipino Films Seen for the First Time in 2009

1) Pagdating sa Dulo (At the Top, Ishmael Bernal, 1971)
2) Bakit Dilaw ang Gitna ng Bahaghari? (Why is Yellow the Middle of the Rainbow?, Kidlat Tahimik, 1994)
3) Bontoc Eulogy (Marlon Fuentes, 1995)
4) Ang Magpakailanman (The Eternity, Raymond Red, 1982)
5) Kagat ng Dilim (Dark Bites, Cesar Hernando, 2006)